Spotlighting Pan-African Poetry

Biography

Priscah Katlholo

Featured Poem:

What Made Us Poets

Enlarge poem

What made us poets
Lies in the graves of our forefathers
We are led by freedom songs
Left not on walls but as part of this air
They are oxygen,
Our strength to hatch on our own
From egg shells as hard as stones
Every now our words shoot like mushrooms around ant hills
We never apologies to the truth
No ‘ifs’ or ‘fears’
Standing strong in the middle of our tears
We are made poets
To empower Africa for Africans
Who can’t remember their skin colour in foreign soils
To Africans who never knew home
These poems are home
To Africans who never wore stenge or matalo
These poems are clothing
To Africans who blew whistles
These poems are horns
To those who worshiped in mosques and synagogues
These poems are hills
To our siblings who met death before time
Due to internal wars and hunger
These poems are life
Then to you and me who wish to write with feathers
These poems are permanent paint
To those who dream stars from colbates for they
Have the sky as their blanket
These poems are shelter
To me the dreamed poet
These poems are my yesterdays and tomorrows
To child soldiers fenced with fear and death
These poems cry’s for their release
To my late grandfather, my late father,
My late uncle
These poems are continuation of their dream
These poems are for books that were never written
For perished cultures
For now for then and forever
These poems shall be established
For now for then and forever

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (3)
  • Pride (2)
  • Optimism (0)
  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (4)
  • Reflection (1)
  • Captivation (0)
  • Peace (0)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (0)
  • Hope (3)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

Comments

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Biography

Priscah Katlholo joined Poetavango Spoken Word Poetry in the early months of 2010. This dynamic and groundbreaking move was sparked by her friends who saw ‘the dirt I made on every paper I laid my hands on’. These raw squiggles translated as poetry to Priscah’s friends, who urged her to nurture and develop the art form. Thus, Priscah joined the Botswana’s biggest poetry movement and adopted the nom de plume Priskath.

She was born and raised in Maun, under the wings of her grandparents. Together with her cousins at the cattle post, they would gather around the fire and listen to her grandmother‘s great stories. Her grandfather used to poetically praise virtually everything on which their cultural sustenance depended, from rain to cattle. Though unbeknownst to her, those were the first seeds to be planted on her fertile literary farm.

When Priskath started school she was already polished. Needless to say, she excelled in compositions and literature. Her writings are inspired by God and His art. She mostly writes about gender based issues but also touches on other critical life themes depending on what inspires her at that particular moment. As a young woman who adores the music and the power of the lyrics within, Priskath also gets her inspiration from well written Reggae and Country music lyrics.

Her poetry expedition turned into a joyful adventure as she performed in every event that was organized by Poetavango. Being given the platform to perform in international events was indeed an honour and reinforcement of her talent. She performed in all the editions of the Maun International Arts Festival (MIAF) and in the Hundred Thousand Poets for Change (100TPC).

Priskath yearns for the growth of poetry in Botswana. Unless and until poetry has reached the apex of its progression, she will not retire from the written and spoken word.
She says in her own words; ‘The word is of utmost importance. It was there at the very beginning and promised to be there at the very end, who then can deny the importance of the word. We poets and other writers need to ensure that the word reaches the masses in every way possible. It’s our God given duty.’

Priscah Katlholo holds an Associate Degree in Public Relations from Limkokwing University of Creative Technology.

Priscah Katlholo

Biography

Priscah Katlholo joined Poetavango Spoken Word Poetry in the early months of 2010. This dynamic and groundbreaking move was sparked by her friends who saw ‘the dirt I made on every paper I laid my hands on’. These raw squiggles translated as poetry to Priscah’s friends, who urged her to nurture and develop the art form. Thus, Priscah joined the Botswana’s biggest poetry movement and adopted the nom de plume Priskath.

She was born and raised in Maun, under the wings of her grandparents. Together with her cousins at the cattle post, they would gather around the fire and listen to her grandmother‘s great stories. Her grandfather used to poetically praise virtually everything on which their cultural sustenance depended, from rain to cattle. Though unbeknownst to her, those were the first seeds to be planted on her fertile literary farm.

When Priskath started school she was already polished. Needless to say, she excelled in compositions and literature. Her writings are inspired by God and His art. She mostly writes about gender based issues but also touches on other critical life themes depending on what inspires her at that particular moment. As a young woman who adores the music and the power of the lyrics within, Priskath also gets her inspiration from well written Reggae and Country music lyrics.

Her poetry expedition turned into a joyful adventure as she performed in every event that was organized by Poetavango. Being given the platform to perform in international events was indeed an honour and reinforcement of her talent. She performed in all the editions of the Maun International Arts Festival (MIAF) and in the Hundred Thousand Poets for Change (100TPC).

Priskath yearns for the growth of poetry in Botswana. Unless and until poetry has reached the apex of its progression, she will not retire from the written and spoken word.
She says in her own words; ‘The word is of utmost importance. It was there at the very beginning and promised to be there at the very end, who then can deny the importance of the word. We poets and other writers need to ensure that the word reaches the masses in every way possible. It’s our God given duty.’

Priscah Katlholo holds an Associate Degree in Public Relations from Limkokwing University of Creative Technology.

Featured Poem:

What Made Us Poets

Enlarge poem

What made us poets
Lies in the graves of our forefathers
We are led by freedom songs
Left not on walls but as part of this air
They are oxygen,
Our strength to hatch on our own
From egg shells as hard as stones
Every now our words shoot like mushrooms around ant hills
We never apologies to the truth
No ‘ifs’ or ‘fears’
Standing strong in the middle of our tears
We are made poets
To empower Africa for Africans
Who can’t remember their skin colour in foreign soils
To Africans who never knew home
These poems are home
To Africans who never wore stenge or matalo
These poems are clothing
To Africans who blew whistles
These poems are horns
To those who worshiped in mosques and synagogues
These poems are hills
To our siblings who met death before time
Due to internal wars and hunger
These poems are life
Then to you and me who wish to write with feathers
These poems are permanent paint
To those who dream stars from colbates for they
Have the sky as their blanket
These poems are shelter
To me the dreamed poet
These poems are my yesterdays and tomorrows
To child soldiers fenced with fear and death
These poems cry’s for their release
To my late grandfather, my late father,
My late uncle
These poems are continuation of their dream
These poems are for books that were never written
For perished cultures
For now for then and forever
These poems shall be established
For now for then and forever

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (3)
  • Pride (2)
  • Optimism (0)
  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (4)
  • Reflection (1)
  • Captivation (0)
  • Peace (0)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (0)
  • Hope (3)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

Comments

Your email address will not be published.