Spotlighting Pan-African Poetry

Biography

4 Strikes

Enlarge poem

The only reason why I am not a bastard is because my father put a tight clutch on my mother
My thoughts are the sort that bothers with your mind about someone stroking your daughter
The reality of maternal relations breaking their water
Screaming so loud rumbles like thunder
Covering the sounds of genocide in Rwanda
Tutsis and sympathetic Hutus
in death they plundered
Tribunals
Were set for the truth to be uncovered
About
those who got chopped and hacked
When they surrendered
With cross pendants hanging on their necks
Some
ran away from their slayers
So then I
keep my eyes open
In a congregation of prayer
To see death
coming through
Walking on air
rob him off your blessing and give him a cold stare
Beware
children of Africa
Pandemics shall always be there
To keep your population controlled
So to IMF
you will not dare
Stretch your arms
for alms
For poverty is within every square
Inch of a yard
on farms
Where High breed horses are reared
So then they say Mugabe is a mad man
Despite a successful land reform policy muddled by negative media
Think
Outside your TV Box
Compare Mugabe to George Bush
He looks like a black angel to me with no
Wings
no feathers
Dignity rendered
Useless
In flight for the chains of freedom
His people’s lives not spared
This
Is Africa where our leaders walk the aisle of power an hour before your vote
was cast
This
Is Africa where Coca cola and second-hand microwaves
Spread rapidly
through the border s of Congo and Tunduma in Tanzania
Like Ebola
Where G20
make our decision for they are the world controllers
Pushing, pushing , pushing
Pushing for political reforms before
Donors toss the dollars
Before donors toss the dollars
Donors toss the dollars
Donors toss the dollars
Therefore the onus is on us to make more than the proverbial
dollar a day
In our lives for these plights have been baptized
By the most wonderful of names such as
Aids, poverty, unemployment and war
Intertwined in our lives as our voices to the gods pour.

Muki Garang

Featured Poem:

Mullato Radiance

Enlarge poem

Mulatto radiance (Repeat 3 times)
Mullato radiance covered my melanin sphere
casting shadows on our segregated thoughts
Reflecting on glazy blue eyes
covered by black hair
Black hair maybe brown
am not really sure
Almost Similar to the color of her intentions
fiercely piercing through my dimly lit room
projecting uncertainty in stuttered speech
So
she spoke mur murmured an index of thoughts
Too complicated to decipher
Mulatto radiance (Repeat 8 times)
So she spoke murmured an index of thoughts
too complicated to decipher
Like crickets chirping
Like moans breaking in through dark light
Awkwardly in shyness we approach each other
Making mutual contacts
Erotic compass
Her bearing will loose you
courtesy of her Exotic rythm
Writhing like a serpent on silky covers shamelessly
yet honestly exposing our quests
For hear now the truth has spoken
In a language only defined to our ears as music
For hear now the truth has spoken
In a language only defined to our ears as music
Mulatto radiance (Repeat 8 times)
For hear now the truth has spoken
In a language only defined to our ears as music
In a demeanour that equalizes stereotypes
to the same beat per minute
Based on the principle that our hearts beat
On the same beat per minute
Allow me to define this moment
Her radiance filled me with awe
Like a cat’s eyes in pitch black
Glowing so definitely ghostly
Such a complicated dichotomy
Sour milk ferments mahogany
If only I could explain
This radiance that
covers my melanin
If i could only explain
Mulatto radiance

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  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (0)
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  • Amusement (0)
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  • Vigour (0)
  • Hope (0)
  • Sadness (0)
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  • Jubilation (0)

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Biography

Muki is committed to the Kenyan art scene because he believes he can utilise the power of entertainment to provide education on different key issues affecting the Kenyan population.

Over the past few years he has conducted interviews at The Hampshire College addressing various topics on East African Hip Hop, including the historical context, the role of popular culture as a mode of expression and tool for public education and the possibilities of using the avenue to address various community needs.

More importantly his work utilises music as a tool for community empowerment, this work is captured in Prof. Mwenda Ntaragwis book titled East African Hiphop: Youth, culture and globolization.

In his tenure as an activist, he has engaged in a number of socially conscious projects, collaborating with institutions such as the Sarakasi Trust, French Cultural Centre, Goethe Institute and the British council.

More than being a poet and Hiphop artist, Muki is the co-founder of Words and Pictures (WAPI) – an acclaimed youth arts project in Nairobi which serves as a monthly platform for upcoming artists (for which he was nominated for the British Council’s International Youth Entrepreneur of the Year Award in 2006).

He convened a project called ‘Hip Hop Parliament’ in the midst of the post-election violence 2007/2008 in Kenya, as a means to engage Nairobi’s youth in positive dialogue across ethnic lines. In addition he is the founder of Maisha Yetu – a non-profit arts organization for youth, and he also worked at Ghetto Radio 89.5fm as an editor for their online journal www.ghettoradio.nl.

 

Muki Garang

Biography

Muki is committed to the Kenyan art scene because he believes he can utilise the power of entertainment to provide education on different key issues affecting the Kenyan population.

Over the past few years he has conducted interviews at The Hampshire College addressing various topics on East African Hip Hop, including the historical context, the role of popular culture as a mode of expression and tool for public education and the possibilities of using the avenue to address various community needs.

More importantly his work utilises music as a tool for community empowerment, this work is captured in Prof. Mwenda Ntaragwis book titled East African Hiphop: Youth, culture and globolization.

In his tenure as an activist, he has engaged in a number of socially conscious projects, collaborating with institutions such as the Sarakasi Trust, French Cultural Centre, Goethe Institute and the British council.

More than being a poet and Hiphop artist, Muki is the co-founder of Words and Pictures (WAPI) – an acclaimed youth arts project in Nairobi which serves as a monthly platform for upcoming artists (for which he was nominated for the British Council’s International Youth Entrepreneur of the Year Award in 2006).

He convened a project called ‘Hip Hop Parliament’ in the midst of the post-election violence 2007/2008 in Kenya, as a means to engage Nairobi’s youth in positive dialogue across ethnic lines. In addition he is the founder of Maisha Yetu – a non-profit arts organization for youth, and he also worked at Ghetto Radio 89.5fm as an editor for their online journal www.ghettoradio.nl.

 

4 Strikes

Enlarge poem

The only reason why I am not a bastard is because my father put a tight clutch on my mother
My thoughts are the sort that bothers with your mind about someone stroking your daughter
The reality of maternal relations breaking their water
Screaming so loud rumbles like thunder
Covering the sounds of genocide in Rwanda
Tutsis and sympathetic Hutus
in death they plundered
Tribunals
Were set for the truth to be uncovered
About
those who got chopped and hacked
When they surrendered
With cross pendants hanging on their necks
Some
ran away from their slayers
So then I
keep my eyes open
In a congregation of prayer
To see death
coming through
Walking on air
rob him off your blessing and give him a cold stare
Beware
children of Africa
Pandemics shall always be there
To keep your population controlled
So to IMF
you will not dare
Stretch your arms
for alms
For poverty is within every square
Inch of a yard
on farms
Where High breed horses are reared
So then they say Mugabe is a mad man
Despite a successful land reform policy muddled by negative media
Think
Outside your TV Box
Compare Mugabe to George Bush
He looks like a black angel to me with no
Wings
no feathers
Dignity rendered
Useless
In flight for the chains of freedom
His people’s lives not spared
This
Is Africa where our leaders walk the aisle of power an hour before your vote
was cast
This
Is Africa where Coca cola and second-hand microwaves
Spread rapidly
through the border s of Congo and Tunduma in Tanzania
Like Ebola
Where G20
make our decision for they are the world controllers
Pushing, pushing , pushing
Pushing for political reforms before
Donors toss the dollars
Before donors toss the dollars
Donors toss the dollars
Donors toss the dollars
Therefore the onus is on us to make more than the proverbial
dollar a day
In our lives for these plights have been baptized
By the most wonderful of names such as
Aids, poverty, unemployment and war
Intertwined in our lives as our voices to the gods pour.

Featured Poem:

Mullato Radiance

Enlarge poem

Mulatto radiance (Repeat 3 times)
Mullato radiance covered my melanin sphere
casting shadows on our segregated thoughts
Reflecting on glazy blue eyes
covered by black hair
Black hair maybe brown
am not really sure
Almost Similar to the color of her intentions
fiercely piercing through my dimly lit room
projecting uncertainty in stuttered speech
So
she spoke mur murmured an index of thoughts
Too complicated to decipher
Mulatto radiance (Repeat 8 times)
So she spoke murmured an index of thoughts
too complicated to decipher
Like crickets chirping
Like moans breaking in through dark light
Awkwardly in shyness we approach each other
Making mutual contacts
Erotic compass
Her bearing will loose you
courtesy of her Exotic rythm
Writhing like a serpent on silky covers shamelessly
yet honestly exposing our quests
For hear now the truth has spoken
In a language only defined to our ears as music
For hear now the truth has spoken
In a language only defined to our ears as music
Mulatto radiance (Repeat 8 times)
For hear now the truth has spoken
In a language only defined to our ears as music
In a demeanour that equalizes stereotypes
to the same beat per minute
Based on the principle that our hearts beat
On the same beat per minute
Allow me to define this moment
Her radiance filled me with awe
Like a cat’s eyes in pitch black
Glowing so definitely ghostly
Such a complicated dichotomy
Sour milk ferments mahogany
If only I could explain
This radiance that
covers my melanin
If i could only explain
Mulatto radiance

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (0)
  • Pride (0)
  • Optimism (0)
  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (0)
  • Reflection (0)
  • Captivation (0)
  • Peace (0)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (0)
  • Hope (0)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

4 Strikes

Enlarge poem

The only reason why I am not a bastard is because my father put a tight clutch on my mother
My thoughts are the sort that bothers with your mind about someone stroking your daughter
The reality of maternal relations breaking their water
Screaming so loud rumbles like thunder
Covering the sounds of genocide in Rwanda
Tutsis and sympathetic Hutus
in death they plundered
Tribunals
Were set for the truth to be uncovered
About
those who got chopped and hacked
When they surrendered
With cross pendants hanging on their necks
Some
ran away from their slayers
So then I
keep my eyes open
In a congregation of prayer
To see death
coming through
Walking on air
rob him off your blessing and give him a cold stare
Beware
children of Africa
Pandemics shall always be there
To keep your population controlled
So to IMF
you will not dare
Stretch your arms
for alms
For poverty is within every square
Inch of a yard
on farms
Where High breed horses are reared
So then they say Mugabe is a mad man
Despite a successful land reform policy muddled by negative media
Think
Outside your TV Box
Compare Mugabe to George Bush
He looks like a black angel to me with no
Wings
no feathers
Dignity rendered
Useless
In flight for the chains of freedom
His people’s lives not spared
This
Is Africa where our leaders walk the aisle of power an hour before your vote
was cast
This
Is Africa where Coca cola and second-hand microwaves
Spread rapidly
through the border s of Congo and Tunduma in Tanzania
Like Ebola
Where G20
make our decision for they are the world controllers
Pushing, pushing , pushing
Pushing for political reforms before
Donors toss the dollars
Before donors toss the dollars
Donors toss the dollars
Donors toss the dollars
Therefore the onus is on us to make more than the proverbial
dollar a day
In our lives for these plights have been baptized
By the most wonderful of names such as
Aids, poverty, unemployment and war
Intertwined in our lives as our voices to the gods pour.

Comments

Your email address will not be published.