Spotlighting Pan-African Poetry

Biography

blood fi oil (part 2)

Enlarge poem

from sun up to sun dung

people nuh nyam

gunshot blazing in Sudan

Janjaweed bad breed hab dem plan

initiated by Bush an him gangs

chasing black Africans affa dem lan

fi exploit de oil wut billions a gallong

wanted dead or alive by de oil barrons

time fi talk de truth United Nation

time fi talk de truth Kofi Annan

de scramble fi Africa on de rise again

United Snake and A-robs a fren

now humanitatian crisis

lata a rise in oil prices

lives nuh wut nutten to Hallibutten

a time fi black people show dem suppen

an start cut troat deepa dan dem wells

an bury de corps a de oil cartels

wen a nuh one ting a de ada

masacre afta masacre

wen a nuh precious metal a stone an rubba

from Angola to Liberia

from Congo to Rwanda

hundreds a panya maschette escape from Beljum

an a rip thru skull lakka bullits from a gun

rite thru Africa mi seet

blood a spill fi de mark a de beast

Darfur region tun ghost town

Janjaweed malitia a hunt dem dung

raping an a killing

village bun dung to de grun

man ina numba ten an oval office

a tun an a twist

a sey dis yah a nuh genocide

is jus anada humanitarian crisis

but millions a die

cyaan even bite de fly

wha pitch pon dem mouth caana

not even a drink a waata

de international community sey dem a help

but de media jus a help dem self

United States put sanctions pon medical supplies

fi mek black people die like flies

why! why!

world leaders why

how many will ave to die

fi de price a de oil

blood! blood! blood fi oil

Appeared on Writing’s On The Wall CD, Abeng Productions 2007

Kokumo Noxid

Featured Poem:

A Declaration of Self

Enlarge poem

I an I was mis-educated about me
I an I was given someone else’s history?
That had nothing to do with my-story?
That leaves me still searching for an identity
Still living by the white man’s philosophy
So I embarked on my own self-discovery
And here I am!
I found out that my given name
Has no significant meaning
Other than a brand and a means of false identification
Imposed by slave masters,
Missionaries and false Christian doctrines
I found out that civilization began on the banks of The Nile
And that we are all Afrikans
It was one genetic strand that started the creation of U-man
The first Homo sapiens, sapiens…. original Blackman
We were the masters of crafts,
Built monuments and empires
Kingdoms and the great Pyramids
Sailed the high seas
Long before Britannia ruled any waves
We were no slaves
We were the first
To study astrology,
Mathematics, physics and chemistry
We studied anatomy; we had the first physicians
We were the first
To do open heart surgeries and brain operations
Hemotep was the father of medicine
Not the Greeks or the Romans
Pythagoras, Plato, Socrates, Aristotle
Your so-called great Philosophers
All exploited Kemets legacy
True Christian principles began in Itheopia (Kush)
Our stories were stolen by the Greeks and brought to Alexandria
Then destroyed in 47 B.C. by Emperor Caesar
When he burnt the library to the ground
But now the truth has been found
I an’ I believe in Highly Selassie I – The Power of the Trinity
I an’ I believe in the teachings
Of Marcus Mosiah Garvey and his prophesies
And the positive words of Robert Nesta Marley (Bob)
I found out that all the negative elements about us
Were injected during slavery and is now affecting our society
Racial and social segregation
Is affecting the behavior of the younger generation
And it’s simply a state of confusion
That is leading to their destruction
So I think it’s time to take a positive action
And declare myself an Afrikan
And furthermore a Rasta man
It’s time for repatriation
(Appeared on the album “Writing’s On The Wall” Abeng Productions 2007)

kokumo noxid

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Biography

Jamaica is without doubt the foremost nation in the world for reggae! However the cultural, political and social climate tends to shape the musical offerings of this glorious nation.

Kokumo is a citizen and artisan from Jamaica whose debut album Writing’s On The Wall may well be the finest recording in the dub poetry vain for many a decade. Kokumo’s delivery will obviously draw comparisons to Mutabaruka but there is an originality of style that will appeal to audiences worldwide.

Described as not just an artist but also a cultural anthropologist and dub-griot, Kokumo uses his skills as a singer/songwriter and a dub-poet to capture his audience, whilst taking them on a cultural, spiritual and political journey.

Hailed from the parish better known as the cockpit country in rural Jamaica, seems to have contributed to the powerful voice that allows his words to take flight.

With a name meaning, “this one will not die” in Yoruba, is synonymous with the notion that his work will be around forever.

His work is rooted in the consciousness of Rasta and the cultural experiences of black people worldwide. This consciousness was triggered from an early age which he credited to being around his Rastafarian cousins but didn’t manifest until a later stage in life when he began to write songs and poetry.

Kokumo’s multidisciplinary skills as a performer have landed him roles in plays at the Royal Shakespeare Company and his own sold out production, GENESIS 9:25 @ The Birmingham Rep. Theatre, 2010. He also appeared at The Tate Britain, The Poetry Café London, BBC Radio 4, B-Spoken Word, BBC WM, Robert Beckford Show and the colourful face introducing Benjamin Zephaniah at Griotology held at The Drum, for his T.V. documentary, This OBE Is Not For Me.

Kokumo has being commissioned to write and perform for organizations such as Oxfam International Birmingham, Arts Council England, West Midlands and BBC WM to mark the 200th Anniversary of the abolition of the Slave Trade in The British Parliament. Other highlights include his appearance at Calabash Festival, Glastonbury Festival and being included in the “RED” anthology published by Peepal Tree Press 2010.

His written works has also being published in numerous magazines and online journals, most recent appeared in dialogue – a magazine for cultural literacy, No. 2/Vol. 3, (http://www.lulu.com/roikwabena), edited by the late Dr. Roi Kwabena.

Kokumo Noxid

kokumo noxid
kokumo noxid

Biography

Jamaica is without doubt the foremost nation in the world for reggae! However the cultural, political and social climate tends to shape the musical offerings of this glorious nation.

Kokumo is a citizen and artisan from Jamaica whose debut album Writing’s On The Wall may well be the finest recording in the dub poetry vain for many a decade. Kokumo’s delivery will obviously draw comparisons to Mutabaruka but there is an originality of style that will appeal to audiences worldwide.

Described as not just an artist but also a cultural anthropologist and dub-griot, Kokumo uses his skills as a singer/songwriter and a dub-poet to capture his audience, whilst taking them on a cultural, spiritual and political journey.

Hailed from the parish better known as the cockpit country in rural Jamaica, seems to have contributed to the powerful voice that allows his words to take flight.

With a name meaning, “this one will not die” in Yoruba, is synonymous with the notion that his work will be around forever.

His work is rooted in the consciousness of Rasta and the cultural experiences of black people worldwide. This consciousness was triggered from an early age which he credited to being around his Rastafarian cousins but didn’t manifest until a later stage in life when he began to write songs and poetry.

Kokumo’s multidisciplinary skills as a performer have landed him roles in plays at the Royal Shakespeare Company and his own sold out production, GENESIS 9:25 @ The Birmingham Rep. Theatre, 2010. He also appeared at The Tate Britain, The Poetry Café London, BBC Radio 4, B-Spoken Word, BBC WM, Robert Beckford Show and the colourful face introducing Benjamin Zephaniah at Griotology held at The Drum, for his T.V. documentary, This OBE Is Not For Me.

Kokumo has being commissioned to write and perform for organizations such as Oxfam International Birmingham, Arts Council England, West Midlands and BBC WM to mark the 200th Anniversary of the abolition of the Slave Trade in The British Parliament. Other highlights include his appearance at Calabash Festival, Glastonbury Festival and being included in the “RED” anthology published by Peepal Tree Press 2010.

His written works has also being published in numerous magazines and online journals, most recent appeared in dialogue – a magazine for cultural literacy, No. 2/Vol. 3, (http://www.lulu.com/roikwabena), edited by the late Dr. Roi Kwabena.

blood fi oil (part 2)

Enlarge poem

from sun up to sun dung

people nuh nyam

gunshot blazing in Sudan

Janjaweed bad breed hab dem plan

initiated by Bush an him gangs

chasing black Africans affa dem lan

fi exploit de oil wut billions a gallong

wanted dead or alive by de oil barrons

time fi talk de truth United Nation

time fi talk de truth Kofi Annan

de scramble fi Africa on de rise again

United Snake and A-robs a fren

now humanitatian crisis

lata a rise in oil prices

lives nuh wut nutten to Hallibutten

a time fi black people show dem suppen

an start cut troat deepa dan dem wells

an bury de corps a de oil cartels

wen a nuh one ting a de ada

masacre afta masacre

wen a nuh precious metal a stone an rubba

from Angola to Liberia

from Congo to Rwanda

hundreds a panya maschette escape from Beljum

an a rip thru skull lakka bullits from a gun

rite thru Africa mi seet

blood a spill fi de mark a de beast

Darfur region tun ghost town

Janjaweed malitia a hunt dem dung

raping an a killing

village bun dung to de grun

man ina numba ten an oval office

a tun an a twist

a sey dis yah a nuh genocide

is jus anada humanitarian crisis

but millions a die

cyaan even bite de fly

wha pitch pon dem mouth caana

not even a drink a waata

de international community sey dem a help

but de media jus a help dem self

United States put sanctions pon medical supplies

fi mek black people die like flies

why! why!

world leaders why

how many will ave to die

fi de price a de oil

blood! blood! blood fi oil

Appeared on Writing’s On The Wall CD, Abeng Productions 2007

Featured Poem:

A Declaration of Self

Enlarge poem

I an I was mis-educated about me
I an I was given someone else’s history?
That had nothing to do with my-story?
That leaves me still searching for an identity
Still living by the white man’s philosophy
So I embarked on my own self-discovery
And here I am!
I found out that my given name
Has no significant meaning
Other than a brand and a means of false identification
Imposed by slave masters,
Missionaries and false Christian doctrines
I found out that civilization began on the banks of The Nile
And that we are all Afrikans
It was one genetic strand that started the creation of U-man
The first Homo sapiens, sapiens…. original Blackman
We were the masters of crafts,
Built monuments and empires
Kingdoms and the great Pyramids
Sailed the high seas
Long before Britannia ruled any waves
We were no slaves
We were the first
To study astrology,
Mathematics, physics and chemistry
We studied anatomy; we had the first physicians
We were the first
To do open heart surgeries and brain operations
Hemotep was the father of medicine
Not the Greeks or the Romans
Pythagoras, Plato, Socrates, Aristotle
Your so-called great Philosophers
All exploited Kemets legacy
True Christian principles began in Itheopia (Kush)
Our stories were stolen by the Greeks and brought to Alexandria
Then destroyed in 47 B.C. by Emperor Caesar
When he burnt the library to the ground
But now the truth has been found
I an’ I believe in Highly Selassie I – The Power of the Trinity
I an’ I believe in the teachings
Of Marcus Mosiah Garvey and his prophesies
And the positive words of Robert Nesta Marley (Bob)
I found out that all the negative elements about us
Were injected during slavery and is now affecting our society
Racial and social segregation
Is affecting the behavior of the younger generation
And it’s simply a state of confusion
That is leading to their destruction
So I think it’s time to take a positive action
And declare myself an Afrikan
And furthermore a Rasta man
It’s time for repatriation
(Appeared on the album “Writing’s On The Wall” Abeng Productions 2007)

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (0)
  • Pride (0)
  • Optimism (0)
  • Anger (1)
  • Delight (1)
  • Inspiration (1)
  • Reflection (4)
  • Captivation (0)
  • Peace (1)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (0)
  • Hope (0)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

blood fi oil (part 2)

Enlarge poem

from sun up to sun dung

people nuh nyam

gunshot blazing in Sudan

Janjaweed bad breed hab dem plan

initiated by Bush an him gangs

chasing black Africans affa dem lan

fi exploit de oil wut billions a gallong

wanted dead or alive by de oil barrons

time fi talk de truth United Nation

time fi talk de truth Kofi Annan

de scramble fi Africa on de rise again

United Snake and A-robs a fren

now humanitatian crisis

lata a rise in oil prices

lives nuh wut nutten to Hallibutten

a time fi black people show dem suppen

an start cut troat deepa dan dem wells

an bury de corps a de oil cartels

wen a nuh one ting a de ada

masacre afta masacre

wen a nuh precious metal a stone an rubba

from Angola to Liberia

from Congo to Rwanda

hundreds a panya maschette escape from Beljum

an a rip thru skull lakka bullits from a gun

rite thru Africa mi seet

blood a spill fi de mark a de beast

Darfur region tun ghost town

Janjaweed malitia a hunt dem dung

raping an a killing

village bun dung to de grun

man ina numba ten an oval office

a tun an a twist

a sey dis yah a nuh genocide

is jus anada humanitarian crisis

but millions a die

cyaan even bite de fly

wha pitch pon dem mouth caana

not even a drink a waata

de international community sey dem a help

but de media jus a help dem self

United States put sanctions pon medical supplies

fi mek black people die like flies

why! why!

world leaders why

how many will ave to die

fi de price a de oil

blood! blood! blood fi oil

Appeared on Writing’s On The Wall CD, Abeng Productions 2007

Comments

Your email address will not be published.