Spotlighting Pan-African Poetry

Biography

A Child’s Cry

Enlarge poem

My stomach twists painfully and in rhythm
As the intestines growl in chorus
To the orchestra of my hunger pangs.

I chase away in vain, my chief rivals
The flies, the dogs and the marabou stock
As I sink my short feet into the depths of the filth
In search of my next lunch, supper, and/or breakfast.

It is now three days since I last had a meal.
That was a sumptuous piece of something
That I could not even identify from sight
The colour, smell and taste must have changed
But I thoroughly enjoyed it and thanked the good Lord
For the hearty meal.

I also thanked Him for all your people.
Who throw food in the rubbish heap for me and my kind
And I pray that your generosity continues for ever!

Jane Okot P’ Bitek Langoya

Featured Poem:

Natures Orchestra

Enlarge poem

The branches of the trees nod in unison
As the trees hum softly
In rhythm to the rattling leaves

The flags stand at attention
And wave with as much dignity
As they can muster

Then the invisible conductor gives the command

The dust swirls into action
And dances the “twisty”
Round and up, round and down
Side to side, side to side.

Pieces of rubbish strewn by the roads side
Cannot resist the dance
As they fly higher and higher
In the gust of wind.

The trees groan and creak in crescendo
As they try the “paka chini” dance.

The clouds rapidly gather
Followed closely by it notorious siblings.

At the signal of the invisible conductor
Lightning shows itself off
With flashes in the sky
Like the blinking lights on the Christmas tree.

A prelude to the mighty drummer.

Like a classical music piece
The soft murmur of the drums
Rumbles to a crescendo
And climaxes to a thunderous roar!

Then drip and tap, drip and tap
Then the larger drips and faster painful taps!
And finally the heavenly flood gates are opened
And the pounding rain joins in the chorus.

The parched earth opens up

To greedily soak in the music
From nature’s harmonious orchestra.

The invisible conductor gives the final command
And the music comes to a slow serene stop.

Jane Bitek Langoya

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (2)
  • Pride (2)
  • Optimism (1)
  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (0)
  • Reflection (0)
  • Captivation (1)
  • Peace (1)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (1)
  • Hope (1)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

Comments

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Biography

Jane Okot P’ Bitek Langoya is a Ugandan poet and is one of the children of legendary poet Prof. Okot P’ Bitek (RIP). She is a lawyer by training and holds a MBA (entrepreneurship and business venturing). Her love for poetry started way back during her secondary school days where she would compose poetry and plays for the schools talent shows.

Her poetry was nurtured particularly by her beloved Head Mistress Sr. Cormack Cephas, who went as far as declaring that if she did not want to study literature in ‘’A’ levels then she should go to another school. At that time she was interested in sciences with a view to becoming a doctor. However this was one of the best schools in Uganda so the Head Mistress’s wish became her command.

Her greatest inspiration and influence was her father from whom she adopted the ‘song’ style of poetry. She is a published poet, Song of Farewell, and currently has an unpublished manuscript. Her poetry covers political and social issues, especially those that touch human beings and the rhythm of nature.

Jane Okot P’ Bitek Langoya

Jane Bitek Langoya
Jane Bitek Langoya

Biography

Jane Okot P’ Bitek Langoya is a Ugandan poet and is one of the children of legendary poet Prof. Okot P’ Bitek (RIP). She is a lawyer by training and holds a MBA (entrepreneurship and business venturing). Her love for poetry started way back during her secondary school days where she would compose poetry and plays for the schools talent shows.

Her poetry was nurtured particularly by her beloved Head Mistress Sr. Cormack Cephas, who went as far as declaring that if she did not want to study literature in ‘’A’ levels then she should go to another school. At that time she was interested in sciences with a view to becoming a doctor. However this was one of the best schools in Uganda so the Head Mistress’s wish became her command.

Her greatest inspiration and influence was her father from whom she adopted the ‘song’ style of poetry. She is a published poet, Song of Farewell, and currently has an unpublished manuscript. Her poetry covers political and social issues, especially those that touch human beings and the rhythm of nature.

A Child’s Cry

Enlarge poem

My stomach twists painfully and in rhythm
As the intestines growl in chorus
To the orchestra of my hunger pangs.

I chase away in vain, my chief rivals
The flies, the dogs and the marabou stock
As I sink my short feet into the depths of the filth
In search of my next lunch, supper, and/or breakfast.

It is now three days since I last had a meal.
That was a sumptuous piece of something
That I could not even identify from sight
The colour, smell and taste must have changed
But I thoroughly enjoyed it and thanked the good Lord
For the hearty meal.

I also thanked Him for all your people.
Who throw food in the rubbish heap for me and my kind
And I pray that your generosity continues for ever!

Featured Poem:

Natures Orchestra

Enlarge poem

The branches of the trees nod in unison
As the trees hum softly
In rhythm to the rattling leaves

The flags stand at attention
And wave with as much dignity
As they can muster

Then the invisible conductor gives the command

The dust swirls into action
And dances the “twisty”
Round and up, round and down
Side to side, side to side.

Pieces of rubbish strewn by the roads side
Cannot resist the dance
As they fly higher and higher
In the gust of wind.

The trees groan and creak in crescendo
As they try the “paka chini” dance.

The clouds rapidly gather
Followed closely by it notorious siblings.

At the signal of the invisible conductor
Lightning shows itself off
With flashes in the sky
Like the blinking lights on the Christmas tree.

A prelude to the mighty drummer.

Like a classical music piece
The soft murmur of the drums
Rumbles to a crescendo
And climaxes to a thunderous roar!

Then drip and tap, drip and tap
Then the larger drips and faster painful taps!
And finally the heavenly flood gates are opened
And the pounding rain joins in the chorus.

The parched earth opens up

To greedily soak in the music
From nature’s harmonious orchestra.

The invisible conductor gives the final command
And the music comes to a slow serene stop.

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (2)
  • Pride (2)
  • Optimism (1)
  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (0)
  • Reflection (0)
  • Captivation (1)
  • Peace (1)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (1)
  • Hope (1)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

A Child’s Cry

Enlarge poem

My stomach twists painfully and in rhythm
As the intestines growl in chorus
To the orchestra of my hunger pangs.

I chase away in vain, my chief rivals
The flies, the dogs and the marabou stock
As I sink my short feet into the depths of the filth
In search of my next lunch, supper, and/or breakfast.

It is now three days since I last had a meal.
That was a sumptuous piece of something
That I could not even identify from sight
The colour, smell and taste must have changed
But I thoroughly enjoyed it and thanked the good Lord
For the hearty meal.

I also thanked Him for all your people.
Who throw food in the rubbish heap for me and my kind
And I pray that your generosity continues for ever!

Comments

Your email address will not be published.