Spotlighting Pan-African Poetry

Biography

Voices

Enlarge poem

Do you hear the voices
That echoed by the fireside
When we gathered at the village square
Under the smiling moon
To tell the stories
Sing the songs
And dance to the rhythms
Of our cultural melody
Do you hear the voices?

But that was before the west winds
Filled the sails of the hungry ships
And docked them on our shores
And the voices changed.

Do you hear the bitter cry of our women
As they were dragged through the hot sand
Down into the hellish dungeons
Where the monstrous walls
Defiled their minds
And the holy gentlemen
Stole their honour.

Do you hear the men scream
As they made to tear the chains
That bound their arms and feet.

Do you hear the mournful sobs of the people
As they were led through the door of not return
into the world of untold hardship.

Do you hear the crack of the whip
On the black back of Kunta Kinte
Baked by the unforgiving sun
As he bends to dig the foundations
Of today’s Skyscrapers
“Say your name is Toby”
“My name is Kunta Kinte”

But
Do you hear when the whip master is gone to his God
How the people gather by the fireside
Like the used to do
And sing and dance and tell stories
Like they used to do
Alas! the whip touched their backs
But not their spirit

Do you hear the spirit boiling?
Do you hear the people saying
Enough is Enough
Do you hear the voice of a Garvey
Of Padmore
Of a Dubois
Do you hear the voice of an Nkrumah
On that faithful 57 night declaring to the world
” At long last, the battle has ended
And Ghana, your beloved country,
is Free forever”

Do you hear how Africa took up
the cry of Nkrumah
Do you hear
A Tafawa Balewa
A Patrice Lamumba
A Jomo Kenyata
A Haile Selasie

Do you hear the voices of tens of thousands of people
Marching upon Lincoln’s memorial
To hear a King speak of his dream

Do you hear a Mandela
Shouting from his prison walls “Amandla”
And do you hear the young South Africans singing
“Nkosi sikelel’ iAfrika”

Do you hear a Bob Marley
Calling for Africa Unite
Do you hear an Osibisa
Welcoming you home
Do you hear a Fela Kuti
Singing revolutionary chants
into your heart

So sons and daughters of the land
Take heed
And hear the voices
Voices of Freedom
Voices of Revolution
Voices of Progress

Hear the Voices
That you may have voice
Hear the Voices
That you may be inspired
To make your voice heard

Sing your part
In the melody of the nation
And leave a legacy
That others after you might sing of
As you sing of those before you

In the end
Zion train is coming our way

Chief Moomen

Featured Poem:

The Destination Is Where We Began

Enlarge poem

The world is my heart
The universe my soul,
I am a man in search of Inspiration
Vision in search of Direction.

Count the stars in the sky
Read the lines on my palms
And know this,
There is no difference in heartbeat
No matter where or from whom it beats;
Joy and Sorrow
Pain and Pleasure
Are felt in equal measure
In every heart
None the better
None the worse.
Life’s experiences replicate
Over time
Across time
Within time
There is nothing new
Under the sun
Save different paths
To a universal destination.
There is no song
That has never been sung,
No poem that has never been written,
No thought that has never been thought,
No emotion that has never been felt.
You are no more special
Or no less worse
Than those who walked this earth
Before you
Those who still walk it
And those who will walk it
After you.
Therefore do not take too much pride in your success
Do not blame yourself too much for your failures
Laugh when there is joy
Cry when there is pain
And just live, in-between.

And in living, Understand this,
Do not wait for the Salvation
Because you are the Saviour,
Do not wait for the Redemption
Because you are the Redeemer,
Do not wait for the Revolution
Because you are the Revolutionary,
Do not wait for the Inspiration
BECAUSE YOU ARE THE INSPIRER.

The destination is where we began.

chief new

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (13)
  • Pride (5)
  • Optimism (6)
  • Anger (7)
  • Delight (5)
  • Inspiration (16)
  • Reflection (7)
  • Captivation (3)
  • Peace (1)
  • Amusement (4)
  • Sorrow (5)
  • Vigour (2)
  • Hope (1)
  • Sadness (2)
  • Fear (3)
  • Jubilation (4)

Comments

Your email address will not be published.

Biography

Chief Moomen is currently a teaching assistant at the Theatre Arts Department of the University of Ghana where he studied Creative Writing in English and Play writing in Theatre Arts for his undergraduate degree.

His interest in poetry was ignited when he saw a performance of the American poet, Maya Angelou, in Ghana in the early nineties. Chief Moomen has been doing spoken word for the past five years. He has performed on various platforms including KSM’s Thank God It’s Friday and also makes regular appearances in the poetry section of Metro TV’s The Citizen Comedy Show. Chief Moomen’s poems are vivid with imagery and he transports his audience through a mosaic of experiences and leaves them excited, contemplative, refreshed or simply awed.

His collection of poems dubbed Village Fresh is a favourite amongst many as it takes them back to village life and its little pleasures. Chief Moomen intends to publish an anthology of his poems next year. He enjoys reading, listening to inspirational music and watching adventure and drama movies. He is very sociable and enjoys meeting new people. Chief Moomen intends to continue writing poetry for as long as the fountain of his creativity is nourished with the stream of inspiration.

Chief Moomen

chief new
chief new

Biography

Chief Moomen is currently a teaching assistant at the Theatre Arts Department of the University of Ghana where he studied Creative Writing in English and Play writing in Theatre Arts for his undergraduate degree.

His interest in poetry was ignited when he saw a performance of the American poet, Maya Angelou, in Ghana in the early nineties. Chief Moomen has been doing spoken word for the past five years. He has performed on various platforms including KSM’s Thank God It’s Friday and also makes regular appearances in the poetry section of Metro TV’s The Citizen Comedy Show. Chief Moomen’s poems are vivid with imagery and he transports his audience through a mosaic of experiences and leaves them excited, contemplative, refreshed or simply awed.

His collection of poems dubbed Village Fresh is a favourite amongst many as it takes them back to village life and its little pleasures. Chief Moomen intends to publish an anthology of his poems next year. He enjoys reading, listening to inspirational music and watching adventure and drama movies. He is very sociable and enjoys meeting new people. Chief Moomen intends to continue writing poetry for as long as the fountain of his creativity is nourished with the stream of inspiration.

Voices

Enlarge poem

Do you hear the voices
That echoed by the fireside
When we gathered at the village square
Under the smiling moon
To tell the stories
Sing the songs
And dance to the rhythms
Of our cultural melody
Do you hear the voices?

But that was before the west winds
Filled the sails of the hungry ships
And docked them on our shores
And the voices changed.

Do you hear the bitter cry of our women
As they were dragged through the hot sand
Down into the hellish dungeons
Where the monstrous walls
Defiled their minds
And the holy gentlemen
Stole their honour.

Do you hear the men scream
As they made to tear the chains
That bound their arms and feet.

Do you hear the mournful sobs of the people
As they were led through the door of not return
into the world of untold hardship.

Do you hear the crack of the whip
On the black back of Kunta Kinte
Baked by the unforgiving sun
As he bends to dig the foundations
Of today’s Skyscrapers
“Say your name is Toby”
“My name is Kunta Kinte”

But
Do you hear when the whip master is gone to his God
How the people gather by the fireside
Like the used to do
And sing and dance and tell stories
Like they used to do
Alas! the whip touched their backs
But not their spirit

Do you hear the spirit boiling?
Do you hear the people saying
Enough is Enough
Do you hear the voice of a Garvey
Of Padmore
Of a Dubois
Do you hear the voice of an Nkrumah
On that faithful 57 night declaring to the world
” At long last, the battle has ended
And Ghana, your beloved country,
is Free forever”

Do you hear how Africa took up
the cry of Nkrumah
Do you hear
A Tafawa Balewa
A Patrice Lamumba
A Jomo Kenyata
A Haile Selasie

Do you hear the voices of tens of thousands of people
Marching upon Lincoln’s memorial
To hear a King speak of his dream

Do you hear a Mandela
Shouting from his prison walls “Amandla”
And do you hear the young South Africans singing
“Nkosi sikelel’ iAfrika”

Do you hear a Bob Marley
Calling for Africa Unite
Do you hear an Osibisa
Welcoming you home
Do you hear a Fela Kuti
Singing revolutionary chants
into your heart

So sons and daughters of the land
Take heed
And hear the voices
Voices of Freedom
Voices of Revolution
Voices of Progress

Hear the Voices
That you may have voice
Hear the Voices
That you may be inspired
To make your voice heard

Sing your part
In the melody of the nation
And leave a legacy
That others after you might sing of
As you sing of those before you

In the end
Zion train is coming our way

Featured Poem:

The Destination Is Where We Began

Enlarge poem

The world is my heart
The universe my soul,
I am a man in search of Inspiration
Vision in search of Direction.

Count the stars in the sky
Read the lines on my palms
And know this,
There is no difference in heartbeat
No matter where or from whom it beats;
Joy and Sorrow
Pain and Pleasure
Are felt in equal measure
In every heart
None the better
None the worse.
Life’s experiences replicate
Over time
Across time
Within time
There is nothing new
Under the sun
Save different paths
To a universal destination.
There is no song
That has never been sung,
No poem that has never been written,
No thought that has never been thought,
No emotion that has never been felt.
You are no more special
Or no less worse
Than those who walked this earth
Before you
Those who still walk it
And those who will walk it
After you.
Therefore do not take too much pride in your success
Do not blame yourself too much for your failures
Laugh when there is joy
Cry when there is pain
And just live, in-between.

And in living, Understand this,
Do not wait for the Salvation
Because you are the Saviour,
Do not wait for the Redemption
Because you are the Redeemer,
Do not wait for the Revolution
Because you are the Revolutionary,
Do not wait for the Inspiration
BECAUSE YOU ARE THE INSPIRER.

The destination is where we began.

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (13)
  • Pride (5)
  • Optimism (6)
  • Anger (7)
  • Delight (5)
  • Inspiration (16)
  • Reflection (7)
  • Captivation (3)
  • Peace (1)
  • Amusement (4)
  • Sorrow (5)
  • Vigour (2)
  • Hope (1)
  • Sadness (2)
  • Fear (3)
  • Jubilation (4)

Voices

Enlarge poem

Do you hear the voices
That echoed by the fireside
When we gathered at the village square
Under the smiling moon
To tell the stories
Sing the songs
And dance to the rhythms
Of our cultural melody
Do you hear the voices?

But that was before the west winds
Filled the sails of the hungry ships
And docked them on our shores
And the voices changed.

Do you hear the bitter cry of our women
As they were dragged through the hot sand
Down into the hellish dungeons
Where the monstrous walls
Defiled their minds
And the holy gentlemen
Stole their honour.

Do you hear the men scream
As they made to tear the chains
That bound their arms and feet.

Do you hear the mournful sobs of the people
As they were led through the door of not return
into the world of untold hardship.

Do you hear the crack of the whip
On the black back of Kunta Kinte
Baked by the unforgiving sun
As he bends to dig the foundations
Of today’s Skyscrapers
“Say your name is Toby”
“My name is Kunta Kinte”

But
Do you hear when the whip master is gone to his God
How the people gather by the fireside
Like the used to do
And sing and dance and tell stories
Like they used to do
Alas! the whip touched their backs
But not their spirit

Do you hear the spirit boiling?
Do you hear the people saying
Enough is Enough
Do you hear the voice of a Garvey
Of Padmore
Of a Dubois
Do you hear the voice of an Nkrumah
On that faithful 57 night declaring to the world
” At long last, the battle has ended
And Ghana, your beloved country,
is Free forever”

Do you hear how Africa took up
the cry of Nkrumah
Do you hear
A Tafawa Balewa
A Patrice Lamumba
A Jomo Kenyata
A Haile Selasie

Do you hear the voices of tens of thousands of people
Marching upon Lincoln’s memorial
To hear a King speak of his dream

Do you hear a Mandela
Shouting from his prison walls “Amandla”
And do you hear the young South Africans singing
“Nkosi sikelel’ iAfrika”

Do you hear a Bob Marley
Calling for Africa Unite
Do you hear an Osibisa
Welcoming you home
Do you hear a Fela Kuti
Singing revolutionary chants
into your heart

So sons and daughters of the land
Take heed
And hear the voices
Voices of Freedom
Voices of Revolution
Voices of Progress

Hear the Voices
That you may have voice
Hear the Voices
That you may be inspired
To make your voice heard

Sing your part
In the melody of the nation
And leave a legacy
That others after you might sing of
As you sing of those before you

In the end
Zion train is coming our way

Comments

Your email address will not be published.