Spotlighting Pan-African Poetry

Biography

Chiedu Ifeozo

Featured Poem:

Homecoming

Enlarge poem

I looked out the window, on the little scattered houses, and little cars.

The crowded streets and polluted skies.

The patches of darkness and light, tin roofs on concrete rooms.

Everything seems so quiet from up here.

The chaos of the city, just a familiar picture in the distance.

The people go on with life as normal with no resistance.

With each passing moment the view becomes clearer.

I can make out the yellow danfo buses, as the sounds in my imagination get louder.

I immerse myself in my thoughts, as I stare blankly into the seat in front of me.

The engine shudders, the chairs shake and the frame rattles.

The wheels hit the tarmac and the frame screeches to a halt.

The applause rings out, the smiles break out.

This is it, my homecoming.

The warm heat sips into my skin, welcoming me with vigour.

The arrivals hall is packed, and we’re all staring at each other.

In our minds we all know the land outside is like no other.

We’ll all be having different experiences, but there’ll be a lot of shared thoughts.

Large boxes dance along on the one working machine.

The sweat beads start to appear, as the people start to disappear.

I swear there’s a conspiracy, because my little box seems like it would never appear.

When it finally does, the hall is almost empty.

I walk to the door with the big burly men.

Who stare me down like I need to say my amen’s.

The way they stare would make you act suspicious.

But the lady by their side looked to be auspicious.

I flash a smile and tell her I’m a student back from my education.

To my surprise she waves me past, if only for a donation.

The ride home is long; the radio plays a familiar song.

I’m still on a journey that began yesterday, for some it’s the start of a brand new day.

There are people on the backs of okada’s, old men perched on their verandas.

The generators have already begun their daily shift, there’s workers waiting for a lift.

The lady frying akara is working hard with a smile, once there’s life there’s hope, there’s no denial.

The baby on her back wont stop crying, not sharing the mothers desire to keep on struggling.

The streets are always busy, the people are always noisy.

The familiar sound of home, it’s been a while since I’ve been gone.

The street hawkers outside my window are trying to catch my attention.

But my minds far away, focused only on the situation.

Every image unlocks memories, stories from the past that could fill libraries.

My past is in every corner of these streets, how things have changed.

Life has moved on, for others it still remains the same.

This land stays on my mind, no matter how far away I go.

This is where I’m from; I’m back where I belong.

This is where I was born, and where I’d always return.

This land is full of scars; don’t be deceived by the luxurious cars.

But there’s hope in the futures eyes, a chance that we have the power to change our lives.

This is where my future lies; I have visions of touching the skies.

It’s a tough decision to make; the difficulties may be hard to take.

But you have to look through the clouds; the struggle comes with good rewards.

Mother waits at the front door with a familiar pose and a big smile.

Comfort comes with the warm embrace of family.

Joy comes from conversations not disturbed by any anomaly.

A new phase in my life is just beginning.

This is it, my homecoming.

cheidu new

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (0)
  • Pride (0)
  • Optimism (0)
  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (0)
  • Reflection (0)
  • Captivation (0)
  • Peace (0)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (0)
  • Hope (0)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

Comments

  1. I liked it really well. The piece successfully conveyed it’s message with mental pictures painted in accompaniment. It resembles a prose but broken into verses.

    Chukwuemeka

Your email address will not be published.

Biography

Chiedu Ifeozo is a young Nigerian; he was born in Lagos in the early eighties and his family is originally from Ubulu-uku in Delta state, Nigeria. He completed his secondary school education at Kings College Lagos, and graduated with a master’s degree in Electronics Engineering from the University of Surrey, England. He returned from his studies in England in 2006. Although a keen engineer, he has always had an appreciation for the arts. From an early age, he began by drawing comic books and illustrations. Reading and writing became a passion in his teenage years, drawing inspiration from events in his daily life as well as in his Society. Thoughts on a page is his first book, a collection spanning over 12 years; it focuses mainly on topics such as, politics, social commentary, youth empowerment, inspirational poetry and romance.

He also edits and prints a quarterly anthology titled poetry for charity that raises funds for various charities. These include “These Genes”, a charity that supports sickle cell sufferers and the “Rose of Sharon foundation” which provides scholarships and reading materials for orphans as well as financial aid and skills acquisition programmes for widows. The contributors to the anthology are gathered from many diverse countries using facebook’s social networking platform.

Chiedu Ifeozo

cheidu new
cheidu new

Biography

Chiedu Ifeozo is a young Nigerian; he was born in Lagos in the early eighties and his family is originally from Ubulu-uku in Delta state, Nigeria. He completed his secondary school education at Kings College Lagos, and graduated with a master’s degree in Electronics Engineering from the University of Surrey, England. He returned from his studies in England in 2006. Although a keen engineer, he has always had an appreciation for the arts. From an early age, he began by drawing comic books and illustrations. Reading and writing became a passion in his teenage years, drawing inspiration from events in his daily life as well as in his Society. Thoughts on a page is his first book, a collection spanning over 12 years; it focuses mainly on topics such as, politics, social commentary, youth empowerment, inspirational poetry and romance.

He also edits and prints a quarterly anthology titled poetry for charity that raises funds for various charities. These include “These Genes”, a charity that supports sickle cell sufferers and the “Rose of Sharon foundation” which provides scholarships and reading materials for orphans as well as financial aid and skills acquisition programmes for widows. The contributors to the anthology are gathered from many diverse countries using facebook’s social networking platform.

Featured Poem:

Homecoming

Enlarge poem

I looked out the window, on the little scattered houses, and little cars.

The crowded streets and polluted skies.

The patches of darkness and light, tin roofs on concrete rooms.

Everything seems so quiet from up here.

The chaos of the city, just a familiar picture in the distance.

The people go on with life as normal with no resistance.

With each passing moment the view becomes clearer.

I can make out the yellow danfo buses, as the sounds in my imagination get louder.

I immerse myself in my thoughts, as I stare blankly into the seat in front of me.

The engine shudders, the chairs shake and the frame rattles.

The wheels hit the tarmac and the frame screeches to a halt.

The applause rings out, the smiles break out.

This is it, my homecoming.

The warm heat sips into my skin, welcoming me with vigour.

The arrivals hall is packed, and we’re all staring at each other.

In our minds we all know the land outside is like no other.

We’ll all be having different experiences, but there’ll be a lot of shared thoughts.

Large boxes dance along on the one working machine.

The sweat beads start to appear, as the people start to disappear.

I swear there’s a conspiracy, because my little box seems like it would never appear.

When it finally does, the hall is almost empty.

I walk to the door with the big burly men.

Who stare me down like I need to say my amen’s.

The way they stare would make you act suspicious.

But the lady by their side looked to be auspicious.

I flash a smile and tell her I’m a student back from my education.

To my surprise she waves me past, if only for a donation.

The ride home is long; the radio plays a familiar song.

I’m still on a journey that began yesterday, for some it’s the start of a brand new day.

There are people on the backs of okada’s, old men perched on their verandas.

The generators have already begun their daily shift, there’s workers waiting for a lift.

The lady frying akara is working hard with a smile, once there’s life there’s hope, there’s no denial.

The baby on her back wont stop crying, not sharing the mothers desire to keep on struggling.

The streets are always busy, the people are always noisy.

The familiar sound of home, it’s been a while since I’ve been gone.

The street hawkers outside my window are trying to catch my attention.

But my minds far away, focused only on the situation.

Every image unlocks memories, stories from the past that could fill libraries.

My past is in every corner of these streets, how things have changed.

Life has moved on, for others it still remains the same.

This land stays on my mind, no matter how far away I go.

This is where I’m from; I’m back where I belong.

This is where I was born, and where I’d always return.

This land is full of scars; don’t be deceived by the luxurious cars.

But there’s hope in the futures eyes, a chance that we have the power to change our lives.

This is where my future lies; I have visions of touching the skies.

It’s a tough decision to make; the difficulties may be hard to take.

But you have to look through the clouds; the struggle comes with good rewards.

Mother waits at the front door with a familiar pose and a big smile.

Comfort comes with the warm embrace of family.

Joy comes from conversations not disturbed by any anomaly.

A new phase in my life is just beginning.

This is it, my homecoming.

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (0)
  • Pride (0)
  • Optimism (0)
  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (0)
  • Reflection (0)
  • Captivation (0)
  • Peace (0)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (0)
  • Hope (0)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

Comments

  1. I liked it really well. The piece successfully conveyed it’s message with mental pictures painted in accompaniment. It resembles a prose but broken into verses.

    Chukwuemeka

Your email address will not be published.