Spotlighting Pan-African Poetry

Biography

Two Strangers

Enlarge poem

One Sunday in December,
Two strangers met in church.
The Pastor talked about Salvation
and hope.
Then he told the church to join hands
And pray.
Rwabambarussshii shpirit, Jeshushhhhhh

The strangers joined hands
And prayed for the nation of Israel
And for one another.
Rwabambarussshii shpirit, Jeshushhhhhh
After the service,
The strangers said, Bless you, to one another
And they parted ways.

The next day the strangers met in the supermarket.
They both reached for the last packet of milk.
It spilt on the floor
And they both cussed at each other.
You fool!
You idiot!

And they parted ways.

Beverley Nambozo Nsengiyunva

Featured Poem:

Who is God?

Enlarge poem

The woman who breastfeeds
Tits swinging from darkness to light
Hypnotizing me until I believe
In the blood that turns things white.

Who is God?
The reason why my Sun never wanes
The reason why the Pastorís never sane.
The Father who is also the Son
And the Spirit, the 3 in one.

Who is God?
My upside-down frown; my plate filled with wine
My emptiness, my longing, my Shrine
My daughterís dimples shaped like hearts
My Creator, my Potter, my Art.

Who is God?
The one who is silent when good people die
Who turns away when people ask, Why?
Whose imperfect timing brings death and brings life
Whose blessings are real and sometimes a bluff.

Who is God?
The woman who breastfeeds
Tits swinging from darkness to light
Hypnotizing me until I believe
In the blood that turns things white.

Beverley Nambozo Nsengiyunva

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (2)
  • Pride (1)
  • Optimism (1)
  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (0)
  • Reflection (0)
  • Captivation (0)
  • Peace (0)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (0)
  • Hope (0)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

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Biography

Beverley Nambozo Nsengiyunva is the founder of Beverley Nambozo Poetry Award and Babishai Niwe Literary Foundation which means Creating with You, in a mixture languages. It Babishai Niwe has been coordinating annual poetry awards for Ugandan women since 2008 targeting hundreds of women country-wide over the past 5 years, being the only award o its kind in the country. In 2014, the award will extend to the entire continent, targeting both men and women. In 2013, the foundation will publish an anthology of poetry from poets of Africa. Beverley Nambozo is also the author of Unjumping, a chapbook collection of poetry which was published by erbacce-press in 2010 after she emerged a joint first runner-up in their annual poetry competition. She has a Masters Degree from Lancaster University and devotes a lot of time to being a stay-at-home mum. Beverley currently lives in Kampala and looks forward to travelling far corners of the world with her husband and children.

Beverley Nambozo Nsengiyunva

Beverley Nambozo Nsengiyunva
Beverley Nambozo Nsengiyunva

Biography

Beverley Nambozo Nsengiyunva is the founder of Beverley Nambozo Poetry Award and Babishai Niwe Literary Foundation which means Creating with You, in a mixture languages. It Babishai Niwe has been coordinating annual poetry awards for Ugandan women since 2008 targeting hundreds of women country-wide over the past 5 years, being the only award o its kind in the country. In 2014, the award will extend to the entire continent, targeting both men and women. In 2013, the foundation will publish an anthology of poetry from poets of Africa. Beverley Nambozo is also the author of Unjumping, a chapbook collection of poetry which was published by erbacce-press in 2010 after she emerged a joint first runner-up in their annual poetry competition. She has a Masters Degree from Lancaster University and devotes a lot of time to being a stay-at-home mum. Beverley currently lives in Kampala and looks forward to travelling far corners of the world with her husband and children.

Two Strangers

Enlarge poem

One Sunday in December,
Two strangers met in church.
The Pastor talked about Salvation
and hope.
Then he told the church to join hands
And pray.
Rwabambarussshii shpirit, Jeshushhhhhh

The strangers joined hands
And prayed for the nation of Israel
And for one another.
Rwabambarussshii shpirit, Jeshushhhhhh
After the service,
The strangers said, Bless you, to one another
And they parted ways.

The next day the strangers met in the supermarket.
They both reached for the last packet of milk.
It spilt on the floor
And they both cussed at each other.
You fool!
You idiot!

And they parted ways.

Featured Poem:

Who is God?

Enlarge poem

The woman who breastfeeds
Tits swinging from darkness to light
Hypnotizing me until I believe
In the blood that turns things white.

Who is God?
The reason why my Sun never wanes
The reason why the Pastorís never sane.
The Father who is also the Son
And the Spirit, the 3 in one.

Who is God?
My upside-down frown; my plate filled with wine
My emptiness, my longing, my Shrine
My daughterís dimples shaped like hearts
My Creator, my Potter, my Art.

Who is God?
The one who is silent when good people die
Who turns away when people ask, Why?
Whose imperfect timing brings death and brings life
Whose blessings are real and sometimes a bluff.

Who is God?
The woman who breastfeeds
Tits swinging from darkness to light
Hypnotizing me until I believe
In the blood that turns things white.

How does this featured poem make you feel?

  • Amazement (2)
  • Pride (1)
  • Optimism (1)
  • Anger (0)
  • Delight (0)
  • Inspiration (0)
  • Reflection (0)
  • Captivation (0)
  • Peace (0)
  • Amusement (0)
  • Sorrow (0)
  • Vigour (0)
  • Hope (0)
  • Sadness (0)
  • Fear (0)
  • Jubilation (0)

Two Strangers

Enlarge poem

One Sunday in December,
Two strangers met in church.
The Pastor talked about Salvation
and hope.
Then he told the church to join hands
And pray.
Rwabambarussshii shpirit, Jeshushhhhhh

The strangers joined hands
And prayed for the nation of Israel
And for one another.
Rwabambarussshii shpirit, Jeshushhhhhh
After the service,
The strangers said, Bless you, to one another
And they parted ways.

The next day the strangers met in the supermarket.
They both reached for the last packet of milk.
It spilt on the floor
And they both cussed at each other.
You fool!
You idiot!

And they parted ways.

Comments

Your email address will not be published.